Road Safety Advice

Here at Motor Marks although we deal in the sale and purchase of cherished, personalised and DVLA car registration numbers browse our database we also like to inform our potential customers and road users of the need to be aware of the potential dangers that you can encounter on the roads.

We have therefore compiled a Road Safety Advice for you to familiarise with, even if you already know, it doesn’t help to read up on it again.

Driving Too Close – The 2 second rule.

You should always drive with at least a 2 second time gap between you and the vehicle in front; for example:

On a dry road, choose a point like a lamp post or road sign
When the vehicle in front passes that point, say out loud “Only a fool breaks the 2 second rule”
Check your position in relation to your chosen point as you finish saying this. If you have already passed the point, you are driving too close to the vehicle in front and need to drop back.
In wet weather, double the distance between your vehicle and the one in front by saying “Only a fool breaks the 2 second rule ” twice.

One of the key reasons that drivers lose concentration or become stressed when driving is because they are in a hurry.

Remember COAST 

Concentrate on your driving at all times

Observe all around yyou

Anticipate what might happen next

Space give space at all times, it gives you

Time to plan your driving

Tiredness and Fatigue

It is estimated that drivers who fall asleep at the wheel account for around one fifth of incidents on major roads, to avoid this:

Plan your journey to include a 15 minute break every 2 hours
Don’t start a long trip if you are already tired
Remember the risks if you have to get up unusually early to start a long drive
Try to avoid long trips between midnight and 6am when you are likely to feel sleepy anyway
If you start to feel sleepy, find a safe place to stop
The only real cure for tiredness is proper sleep. A caffeine drink and a 20 minute nap are a short-term solution

Mental and physical fatigue through working long hours, lack of rest and/or not eating properly or getting de-hydrated could lead to a lapse in concentration, reduced reaction time and poor decision making over safety critical issues.

Research shows that almost 20% of collisions on major roads are sleep-related
Peak times for collisions are in the early hours and after lunch
About 40% of sleep-related incidents involve commercial vehicles
Men under 30 have the highest risk of falling asleep at the wheel

 

Emergency Vehicles

By following a few simple steps, you can help the emergency services get to the scene faster and safer:

When you hear sirens, don’t panic and stay alert
When you see blue flashing lights scan the road looking for a place that will allow the emergency vehicle safe passage. You should use your indicators or hand signals to let other drivers and the emergency vehicle driver know your intent to pull over
Don’t slam on your brakes or stop abruptly blocking the road or a junction
Do not mount the pavement causing a danger to other road users
Wait for the emergency vehicle to pass and watch for more than one. Check to make sure the way is clear and signal before moving back into traffic
Never follow or try to outrun the emergency vehicle. If you do, you will most likely be breaking the speed limit and could also face charges of careless or dangerous driving
Never try to overtake a moving emergency vehicle displaying the flashing lights unless directed to do so by a police officer or emergency personnel

 

When will I be safe to drive?

Do you know what the actual limits are when it comes to having a drink and then driving?

Bottled Lager. Drink five bottles and you should not frive for at least 11 hours. That’s 11am the morning after if you finish drinking at midnight.
Wine. If you drink a bottle of 15% wine (just three 250ml glasses) – you should not drive for 13 hours – that’s 1pm the next day if you finish drinking at midnight
Pints. Drink four pints of lager and you should not drive for at least 13 hours. That’s 1pm the next day if you finish drinking at midnight.
Spirits. Drink four 70ml doubles and you should not drive for 13 hours. Thats 1pm the next day iof you finish drinking at midnight.
Cans. Drink five super-strength cans and you should not drive for about 21 hours – almost a full day later.

 

Know your speed limits

Check your speedometer regularly
Know the limits – look for signs, especially at junctions
Street lighting means 30mph, until signs say otherwise
Remember, speed limits are a maximum not a target, try using 3rd gear in a 30mph limit to help you stay in the limit
Recognise what makes you speed – keeping up with traffic, overtaking or being tailgated
Concentrate – distracted drivers speed
The minimum penalty for speeding is £100 fine an 3 penalty points added on your licence.

Be aware and stay safe.

Learner Drivers will now be allowed on Motorways from 2018

From 2018 learner drivers will now be allowed to take driving lessons with an approved driving instructor in a car with dual controls.

At the moment, you can only have driving lessons on motorways after you have passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take the lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus Scheme.

Allowing learner drivers the opportunity to take lessons on the motorway from 2018 will help make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

How will the change work

The change will apply to England, Scotland and Wales. Learner Drivers will need to be accompanied by an approved driving instructor and the car will need to be fitted with dual controls.

Any Motorway lessons will be voluntary. It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough to have a motorway lesson. Trainee driving instructors will not be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

The change will only apply to learner drivers of cars, learner motorcyclists will not be allowed to have motorway lessons.

The changes are being made to allow learner drivers to get a broader driving experience before taking their driving test. To get training on how to join and leave the motorway, overtake and use the lanes correctly. To practise their driving at higher speeds and to put their theoretical knowledge into practice.

 

DVSA will not be giving driving instructors extra training on providing motorway lessons but learning materials and the car driving syllabus will be updated to incorporate motorway lessons.

DVSA will also work with driving instructor associations and Highways England to provide extra guidance and advice for driving instructors.

The exact date for this in 2018  change will be confirmed nearer the time.

The change will be well publicised so driving instructors and learner drivers are prepared for the change, and other road users know what to expect. The Highway Code rules on Motorways will also be updated.

Until the law is changed it is still ILLEGAL for learner drivers to drive on the motorway.

 

Stay safe and Happy Motoring.

Also don’t forget if you want a personalised number plate or cherished number plate please browse through our online database of millions of numbers

 

AB 1 Number Plate

A former chief constable has bought the first number plate AB 1 issued to the county after a police boss put the number plate up for sale.

The West Mercia Police and Crime Commissioner John Campion faced a backlash from ex-officers after he decided to sell the cherished AB 1 number plate to raise money for police funds.

Mr Campion said the car number plate had not been used for six years for security reasons and said the force was unlikely to use the car number plate on any of its vehicles in the future. His decision however sparked an angry backlash from several former police officers including Alan Matthews who launched a petition against the sale and which attracted 895 supporters.

The AB 1 cherished car registration number was traditionally displayed on the staff cars of the Worcestershires chief constables.

Paul West a former West Mercia Police chief constable has reassured retired officers that the piece of police heritage is safe in his possession.

It has been reported that Mr West purchased the AB 1 Cherished car registration number for £160,000 despite estimates that it was worth between £225,000 and £275,000.

‘I strongly opposed the sale’ he said and once I  knew it was back on the open market we made a decision within the family and we decided we had to buy it.

The former chief constable said he is looking forward to once again driving around in a car which uses the historic car number plate. He also said that he will not sell the cherished number plate during his lifetime and that he will pass it onto his family when he dies.

Remember if you are looking for a cherished or personalised car number plate then search through our millions of number online via our website home page or alternatively contact one of our experienced sales staff on 0116 235 0116.

 

Numberplate woes solved

DVLA amends their website to incorporate rules that were implemented 2 years ago.

The DVLA ‘s website had an outdated page offering incorrect information to millions of classic car owners in the UK, this has now been amended even though the rules were implemented 2 years ago.

The DVLA had quietly announced that the legislation relating to historic vehicle number plates was now applied on the same basis as rolling tax exemption, yet their website had still not been updated with this information until last week.

Until the changes had been amended the website still stated that ‘All vehicles manufactured after 1.1.1973 must display number plates of reflex-reflecting material’ and that ‘Vehicles constructed before 1.1.1973 may display traditional black and white plates’.

The DVLA have now replaced the outdated information and the website now has the correct information showing which reads: Since April 2016 vehicles manufactured before 1st January 1976 can display the older style number plates.

 

 

Number Plates – Auction

Next week see’s another auction of personalised number plates where there will be on offer the chance to purchase 1250 unissued cherished number plates.

We at Motor Marks can bid on your behalf for any of the numbers listed. Please visit our Auction page where you will see list of all the cherished number plates on sale.

Below we have compiled a few of the gimmicky ones.

If you would like Motor Marks to bid for any of the above cherished number plates or any of the personalised number plates in the forthcoming auction please contact one of our sales staff on
0116 235 0116.

You can view our millions of car number plates online via our website home page search

Speeding Fines – New Rules are you Aware?

Back In March 2017 a Trio of new Motoring Laws came in.

The first one was regarding the use of Mobile Phones Behind The Wheel.
Anyone caught using one was immediately fined £200 and given 6 penalty points. The new legislation did not only affect using a mobile phone but also the use of any internet device behind the wheel.

The second was Child Car Seat Regulations.
Cushion booster seats will now be restricted to older children only. The change in the regulation means that any child under 4.1 feet tall and less than 3.5 stone in weight must use a child seat with a back instead of a backless booster cushion, however children must continue to use an appropriate child seat until they are either 4.4 feet tall or 12 years old.
The reason is that backless car seats offer far less protection in the event of a collision, particularly in the event of a side-on crash, and could end up proving fatal to younger or smaller children.
Anyone caught not using an appropriate child seat for their car will be faced with a £100 fine, however it should be noted that the new law only applies to seats which are purchased after March 1st 2017.

The third new Motoring Law was regarding  Speeding Fines.
Under the new rules, which were actually introduced on April 24th 2017, drivers can be charged up to 175% of their weekly wage. There is a cap of £1000 on minor speeding offences or up to £2500 for major ones.
A three band system will determine the severity of an offence and corresponds to different charges.
These charges are calculated on a percentage basis. A minor offence constitutes a Band A charge.

Band A charges are for drivers who exceed the stated speed limit between 1 and 10mph. So, if a driver travels 31mph up to 40mph in a 30mph zone, they can be charged between 25% and 75% of their weekly income.
Drivers who exceed the stated speed limit by 11mph up to 20mph will be charged between 75% and 125% of their weekly wage.
Major offences, which are for speed limit breaches of up to 22mph and above will be charged between 125% and 175% of their weekly wage.
In addition to the above variable fees for speeding offences, motorists could also receive between 3 and 6 penalty points.

 

Number Plates – Royal Ascot

This week sees Royal Ascot. Ascot Racecourse is a British Racecourse located in Ascot, Berkshire which is used for thoroughbred horse racing. The course enjoys close associations with the British Royal Family and is approximately 6 miles from Windsor Castle. The Royal Meeting is held in June and its highlight is The Gold Cup.

Ascot Racecourse was founded in 1711 by Queen Anne. The first race ‘Her Majesty’s Plate’ with a purse of 100 guineas was held on 11 August 1711. Seven horses competed, each carrying a weight of 12 stones. This first race comprised three separate four mile heats.

In 1813 Parliament passed an Act to ensure that the grounds would remain a public racecourse. A new grandstand was opened in 1839. A further Act of Parliament of 1913 (Ascot Authority Act 1913 c.lxxxiv) establishing the Ascot Authority which entity manages the racecourse to this day.

From its creation until 1945 the only racing that took place at Ascot was the Royal Meeting, a four day event. Since that date, more fixtures have been introduced to the grounds, notably steeplechase and hurdles in 1965.

 

Every year Royal Ascot is attended by Queen Elizabeth II and other members of the British Royal Family, arriving each day in a horse drawn carriage with the Royal procession taking place at the start of each race day and the raising of the Queen’s Royal Standard. It is a major event in the British social calendar, and the press coverage of the attendees and what they are wearing often exceeds the actual racing. There are three enclosures attended by guests on Royal Ascot week.

Over 300,000 people make the annual visit to Berkshire during Royal Ascot week, making this Europe’s best attended race meeting. The Gold Cup is on Ladies day on the Thursday.

We at Motor Marks have compiled a short list of personalised and cherished number plates that we think are suitable for Royal Ascot and have listed them below.

Don’t forget if you would like your own cherished or private number plate please contact one of our experienced sales staff on 0116 235 0116 and they will be happy to help.
Alternatively go to our home page on the website where you can search through millions of personalised number plates online.

Cherished Number Plates

What is a Cherished Number Plate?

A Cherished Number Plate is a term that is traditionally used to describe a dateless number plate ie without a prefix or suffix letter at either end and therefore generally one that was issued before 1963. Nowadays however a cherished number plate can be any plate where it is significant to the owner and there are various terms that are now used such as personalised number plate and private number plate.

In keeping with the year of the number plate you can also get authentic car number plates made to suit the period of your car.

Cast Plates 1920’s- 1930’s

These are solid cast plates, painted black and the digits are then polished. Cast Aluminium Plates became common in the period of the 1920′ to the 1930’s

Die Pressed Aluminium Plates 1930’s – 1962

Die Pressed Aluminium Plates were introduced in the early 1930’s. 16 gauge polished aluminium is embossed with the registration and then stove enamelled. Embossed borders were an option on standard sizes. Many marques decided to use non-standard sizes such as Rolls Royce and Jaguar and Ferrari.

Gothic Aluminium Plates 1950’s – 1962

Available in painted hand white or hand polished cast aluminium finish. These are 31/2″ digits period correct for vehicles between the 1950’s and early 1960’s

Plastic Digit Plates

Plastic digit plates were first introduced to mimic the cast plates with flat or oval digits which later changed to peaked and then trapezoidal profiled digits. In the mid 1960’s they were replaced with injection moulded plastic.

Mirrorline ‘Hand Engraved Plates’

Reverse engraved acrylic plates were developed in the early 1970’s and feature the registration engraved into the black backing of the plate allowing the backing material of either polished or brushed aluminium to be seen through the clear acrylic.

Post 73′ Number Plates

70’s style number plates using black plastic digits on a white or yellow reflective metal background.

Alternatively you can just go for the standard black lettering on white and yellow plastic which are seen on most everyday cars today.

If you would like us to supply any of the above car number plates for your vehicle or would like to acquire your own Cherished Number Plate please contact one of our Sales Staff on 0116 235 0116.

Classic Cars – T Charge Emissions Surcharge – update

Back in a blog post in July 2016 we told you about the proposed new emissions surcharge for tax exempt classic cars for central London.

As from Autumn 2017 tax exempt classic cars will not have to pay the £10 London Emissions Surcharge otherwise known as  the ‘Toxicity Charge’ or ‘T Charge’, drivers of non-compliant cars will have to find the extra funds – billed Monday to Friday between 7am and 6pm from October 23rd 2017. Charging will not take place on Bank Holidays or during the festive period from Christmas Day to New Year’s day,

In a decision which has been welcomed by the Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs (FBHVC) vehicles taxed as ‘historic’ under rolling 40 year Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) will only pay the Congestion Charge which is £11.50 (for cars)  to enter Central London.

Owners of so called ‘modern classics’ will be hit by the Emissions Surcharge. Any car built before 2005 (Euro 4) emissions standard will be liable for the standard Central London Congestion Charge (£11.50 for cars) plus the new T Charge (£10).

To see the full T Charge/Emissions Surcharge Data go to the Transport for London (TfL) website

https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/driving/emissions-surcharge?cid=emissions-surcharge

Below is a map showing the The Emissions (T Charge) zone from which £0 VED classics are exempt

 

DVLA – adding missing car marques at last.

The DVLA has caved in to pressure from classic car owners and is starting to add missing car marques on to it’s online database.

If you remember we informed you of this issue back in July 2016 whereby the DVLA website was missing 43 marques on it’s online database.

Research reveals that owners and prospective buyers for previously missing marques such as Alvis, Allard, DeLorean, Crossley and Standard can now finally look up MoT history, tax and insurance data using the DVLA’s online service. And just in time too; as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is urging classic car owners to check MoT details online after admitting that the paper versions are vulnerable to forgery. Most buyers accept paper MoT’s at face value but there are cloned and clocked vehicles so now you can check online so buyers don’t have to be so trusting.

Starting from the beginning of May the online Vehicle Enquiry Service will also be updated so owners will no longer have to look up records.

The Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs (FBHVC), however confirmed that the changes to registering classics or making changes to the V5C online have not been made yet. Geoff Lancaster FBHVC communications director explains; What you cannot do is enter a model name which does not have a V55/5 code. If you do not include a model name in a registration form, the DVLA may pull the model and make boxes correctly shown in the paper form into the just the make field in the online database. We think we have persuaded them to stop this. The FBHVC’s recommendation to those making new applications for registrations, particularly in respect of older overseas vehicles which are not likely to have relevant codes, is to not complete the ‘model’ portion of the V55/5.

 

 

 


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