Road Safety Advice

Here at Motor Marks although we deal in the sale and purchase of cherished, personalised and DVLA car registration numbers browse our database we also like to inform our potential customers and road users of the need to be aware of the potential dangers that you can encounter on the roads.

We have therefore compiled a Road Safety Advice for you to familiarise with, even if you already know, it doesn’t help to read up on it again.

Driving Too Close – The 2 second rule.

You should always drive with at least a 2 second time gap between you and the vehicle in front; for example:

On a dry road, choose a point like a lamp post or road sign
When the vehicle in front passes that point, say out loud “Only a fool breaks the 2 second rule”
Check your position in relation to your chosen point as you finish saying this. If you have already passed the point, you are driving too close to the vehicle in front and need to drop back.
In wet weather, double the distance between your vehicle and the one in front by saying “Only a fool breaks the 2 second rule ” twice.

One of the key reasons that drivers lose concentration or become stressed when driving is because they are in a hurry.

Remember COAST 

Concentrate on your driving at all times

Observe all around yyou

Anticipate what might happen next

Space give space at all times, it gives you

Time to plan your driving

Tiredness and Fatigue

It is estimated that drivers who fall asleep at the wheel account for around one fifth of incidents on major roads, to avoid this:

Plan your journey to include a 15 minute break every 2 hours
Don’t start a long trip if you are already tired
Remember the risks if you have to get up unusually early to start a long drive
Try to avoid long trips between midnight and 6am when you are likely to feel sleepy anyway
If you start to feel sleepy, find a safe place to stop
The only real cure for tiredness is proper sleep. A caffeine drink and a 20 minute nap are a short-term solution

Mental and physical fatigue through working long hours, lack of rest and/or not eating properly or getting de-hydrated could lead to a lapse in concentration, reduced reaction time and poor decision making over safety critical issues.

Research shows that almost 20% of collisions on major roads are sleep-related
Peak times for collisions are in the early hours and after lunch
About 40% of sleep-related incidents involve commercial vehicles
Men under 30 have the highest risk of falling asleep at the wheel

 

Emergency Vehicles

By following a few simple steps, you can help the emergency services get to the scene faster and safer:

When you hear sirens, don’t panic and stay alert
When you see blue flashing lights scan the road looking for a place that will allow the emergency vehicle safe passage. You should use your indicators or hand signals to let other drivers and the emergency vehicle driver know your intent to pull over
Don’t slam on your brakes or stop abruptly blocking the road or a junction
Do not mount the pavement causing a danger to other road users
Wait for the emergency vehicle to pass and watch for more than one. Check to make sure the way is clear and signal before moving back into traffic
Never follow or try to outrun the emergency vehicle. If you do, you will most likely be breaking the speed limit and could also face charges of careless or dangerous driving
Never try to overtake a moving emergency vehicle displaying the flashing lights unless directed to do so by a police officer or emergency personnel

 

When will I be safe to drive?

Do you know what the actual limits are when it comes to having a drink and then driving?

Bottled Lager. Drink five bottles and you should not frive for at least 11 hours. That’s 11am the morning after if you finish drinking at midnight.
Wine. If you drink a bottle of 15% wine (just three 250ml glasses) – you should not drive for 13 hours – that’s 1pm the next day if you finish drinking at midnight
Pints. Drink four pints of lager and you should not drive for at least 13 hours. That’s 1pm the next day if you finish drinking at midnight.
Spirits. Drink four 70ml doubles and you should not drive for 13 hours. Thats 1pm the next day iof you finish drinking at midnight.
Cans. Drink five super-strength cans and you should not drive for about 21 hours – almost a full day later.

 

Know your speed limits

Check your speedometer regularly
Know the limits – look for signs, especially at junctions
Street lighting means 30mph, until signs say otherwise
Remember, speed limits are a maximum not a target, try using 3rd gear in a 30mph limit to help you stay in the limit
Recognise what makes you speed – keeping up with traffic, overtaking or being tailgated
Concentrate – distracted drivers speed
The minimum penalty for speeding is £100 fine an 3 penalty points added on your licence.

Be aware and stay safe.

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