MoT’s and Classic Cars

Classic Cars built between 1st January 1960 and 31st December 1977 become MoT exempt from this Sunday 20th May 2018 making the complete responsibility of their roadworthiness placed in the hands of their owners. This may seem a massive change but in fact the situation is business as usual, as keepers of these such vehicles and indeed all other vehicles – have always been responsible for the roadworthiness of their vehicles, the difference is that now such keepers will be persuaded to undertake their own regular vehicle roadworthiness inspections. Pre 1978 cars classed as historic may still be presented for MoT’s but likely that inspectors overtime become fewer and farther between and may lead to failure notices where none should have been issued with resultant difficulties in achieving a pass at the same place or understanding the status of the vehicle. Worse still vehicles could be issued a pass certificate when the car is in fact unsafe.

Large goods vehicles (ie goods vehicles with a maximum laden weight of more than 3.5 tonnes) and buses (ie vehicles with 8 or more seats) that are used commercially will not be exempted from periodic testing when they reach 40 years old. In addition a vehicle that has been substantially changed within the previous 30 years will have to be submitted for annual MoT testing.

How to declare a vehicle for the 40 year MoT exemption.
Vehicle keepers are required to ensure their vehicles are taxed when used on a public road. From May 20th 2018 the keeper of the vehicle can declare their vehicle exempt from the MoT at the point of taxing it if it was constructed more than 40 years ago. You will be asked when declaring the MoT exemption that there has been no substantial changes to the vehicle (a vehicle will be considered substantially changed if the technical characteristics of the main components have changed in the previous 30 years unless the changes fall into specific categories)

Chassis: Replacements of the same pattern as the original, monocoque bodyshells including any sub frames (replacements of the same pattern as the original) are not considered a substantial change.

Axles/Running Gear: Alteration of and/or method of suspension or steering does constitute a substantial change

Engine: Alternative cubic capacities of the same basic engine and alternative original equipment engines are not considered a substantial change. If the number of cylinders in an engine is different from the original it is likely to be but not necessarily the case that the current engine is not alternative original equipment.

The following are considered acceptable NOT substantial changes if they fall into these specific categories:
Changes that are made to preserve a vehicle, which in all cases must be when original-type parts are no longer reasonably available.
Changes of a type that can be demonstrated to have been made when vehicles of the type were in production or in general use (within 10 years of the end of production).
In respect to axles and running gear changes made to improve efficiency,safety or environmental performance.
In respect of vehicles that have been commercial vehicles, changes which can be demonstrated were being made when these vehicles were being used commercially.

In addition if a vehicle (including a motorcyle):
Has been issued with a registration number with a Q prefix, or
Is a kit car assembled from components from various makes and models of vehicle, or
Is a reconstructed classic vehicle as defined by DVLA guidance, or
Is a kit conversion, where a kit of new parts is added to an existing vehicle, or old parts are added to a kit of a manufactured body, chassis or monocoque bodyshell changing the general appearance of the vehicle; It will be considered to have been substantially changed and will not be exempt from MoT testing.

However if any of the above types of vehicle is taxed as a ‘historic vehicle’ and has not been modified during the previous 30 years, it can be considered as Vehicles of Historic Interest (VHI). (Keepers of VHIs exempt from periodic testing continue to be responsible for their vehicles roadworthiness). The guidance is only intended to determine the testing position of a substantially changed vehicle.

How to register your vehicle from MoT Exemption
Where vehicle keepers first apply for the historic vehicle tax class, it must be done at a post office. If you are declaring that your vehicle is exempt from MoT you will need to complete a V112 declaration form, taking into consideration the substantially changed guidelines (as defined above). Further re-licensing applications, including making subsequent declarations that the vehicle does not require an MoT, can be completed online. gov.uk/historic-vehicles

 

Also what better accessory for your classic or historic vehicle, a personalised or cherished number plate. Cheap, Bargain or expensive number plates we have millions to choose from, browse through our database or alternatively give one of our experienced sales staff a call on 0116 235 0116.

Designed by EDS - Build by mh - © Martin McLaughlin 2014