DVLA News

DVLA Backlog

Most of the country were put into lockdown back in March 2020 due to the Coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic that has gripped the world. DVLA were just one of the government bodies that closed most of its services as most of their staff were furloughed.

A reduced staff returned to work at DVLA on 12th June after nearly 3 months on lockdown. This closure has meant that many classic car enthusiasts, motor dealers and general members of the public that had sent in paper applications just before the lockdown have been in limbo as nothing has been processed and basically any paperwork has just been lying in the offices at DVLA. Some of the online services which have been crucial for many however have also had problems which have not seen transfers being processed, and mot and car tax exemptions not being able to be declared and sorted online and therefore having to be sent in as postal applications knowing that the backlog could mean further delays in the processing of the applications. A DVLA spokesperson has said that they are processing the applications as quickly as possible but for some people that has also led to them not being able to use their vehicles.

This has also had an effect with number plate transfers. Most applications can be done using the DVLA online facility but for some where they have purchased a cherished number plate and their vehicle is a classic or imported vehicle or there is an issue regarding sorn or car tax then these applications have not been able to be done online and some customers paperwork has been at DVLA for the whole 3 months of lockdown. If you have any queries they are now answering some telephones in some of their departments at DVLA Swansea but it may be worth waiting a few weeks for them to clear the backlog if you have to send in something to them. Remember always take copies of anything you need to send and if you do manage to speak to an advisor then take a reference number to help if you need to make any further corresponding calls.

We at Motor Marks may be able to help with some of your queries so if you need any advice we are happy to try and help.

Doing these whilst driving could result in a Fine

When it comes to the law and driving most of us think we know the do’s and dont’s of what you can do whilst driving, however there are some things that not all of us know and these can be illegal when driving, so here is a list of things you might not know are illegal when driving..

Using your mobile phone as a sat nav in an unfixed position. Whilst we all know that it is an offence to use your phone (calling/texting) whilst driving, some use it as a sat nav, but it is illegal if it is not fixed on your windscreen or dashboard, the phone needs to be in clear sight and not with you holding it. Due to a recent law change if you are caught breaching this you will receive six points on your licence and a £200 fine, you could also face a driving ban if you have had your license for less than 2 years.

Lots of us motorists will flash other motorists to let them know of speed cameras however you could face a minimum of a £30 fine, you are only supposed to flash your lights at other motorists to warn them of your presence.

Eating or drinking, applying makeup, changing a CD in your car could land you a fine of £100 and up to three to nine penalty points, this is because the police can prosecute you as you may not be in complete control of your vehicle.

Splashing a pedestrian with water could land you with a fine of anything from £100 – £5000 this is because it is classed as an offence to drive “without reasonable consideration for other persons”

Hogging the middle lane of the motorway could land you with a fine as this falls into the catergory of careless driving and you could end up with three penalty points and a £100 fine.

Having a dirty number plate could land you with a £1000 fine as it can make them unreadable so you need to make sure they can seen and not filthy.

Beeping your horn could land you with a £30 fine, you are not supposed to beep your horn for any other reason than alerting someone of your presence, not out of frustration or a little road rage!

Undertaking is a criminal offence and however tempting this is especially on the motorway when someone is hogging the middle lane is not only dangerous you could find yourself in court.

Smoking in your car is illegal and taking a prescription drug before driving could see you banned.

When parking a at night drivers must not park on a road facing against the flow of trafic unless in a dedicated space.

You must never place a rear facing baby seat in a seat with an activated front airbag.

When towing a trailer or a caravan on a motorway you must not exceed 60mph.

Having a child in your vehicle without the appropriate car seat. You must have a child car seat for any child up to the age of 12 or until they reach 135cm in height and the seat needs to be suitable for their weight.

You must not drive on a pavement, footpath or bridleway unless gaining access to a property or in an emergency.

Not informing DVLA Swansea of any changes to your details ie your name and address and also regarding medical conditions such as epilepsy, strokes, neurological and mental health conditions physical disabilities and visual impairments.

Retention Certifcate V778’s and Certificate of Entitlement V750’s Important News

IMPORTANT NEWS – IMPORTANT NEWS – IMPORTANT NEWS

As from 18th December 2019 you will no longer be able to renew out of date retention certificate V778’s or Certificate of Entitlement V750’s. The DVLA Swansea are implementing these changes and the cut off date for renewing any out of date certificates ends on 18th December 2019. YOU MUST RENEW any that you have out of date as there will be no leniency regarding this new ruling.

Example of V778 Retention Document and example of V750 Certificate of Entitlement

Millions of motorists have personalised or cherished number plates on their vehicles but many others hold the rights to use them without actually having them on a vehicle, known as keeping them on retention. Some owners view them as an investment rather than something to adorn a vehicle but DVLA Swansea changes could see motorists lose the right to these investments.

You need to act NOW before it is too late.

For some people this is not common knowledge and therefore we as number plates dealers are making sure that you are aware.

If these changes are going to affect you and your retention documents are out of date, you need to make sure you act now and before the cut off date of 18th December 2019. Currently, if a certificate is out of date you can buy back the right to use it from the DVLA Swansea as long as you obtained the relevant V750 or V778 certificate before March 9th, 2015 and it expired on or after 1st May 2011. You can renew the certificate by paying £25 for every year to get it up to date but this will no longer be the case from 18th December 2019. So if your plate ran out 13 months ago you would pay £50 ( 2 years ) So, if you have an out of date retention document or certificate of entitlement, it is very important to act now or you risk losing your rights to your cherished number plates entirely.

You will need to fill out the form on your documentation and send it to the DVLA Swansea along with the fee owed. If you don’t have your documentation, you need to write to the DVLA Swansea giving a reason for not having the original V778 / V750 document, along with the appropriate fee, details of your cherished number plate and proof of your name and address for example your driving licence.

Failure to comply with these new regulations could have serious consequences as you are basically giving up your rights to your cherished number plates.

Please check any V778 /V750 certificates that you have and act NOW.

Number Plates – Age Identifiers from DVLA Swansea

We get asked quite frequently what identifies the age of a cherished registration number or a DVLA car number plate so I have done a table below to show the relevant age identifiers for number plates.

SUFFIX REGISTRATION NUMBER PLATES

SUFFIX LETTERSTARTEND
A18 February 196331 December 1963
B1 January 196431 December 1964
C1 January 196531 December 1965
D1 January 196631 December 1966
E1 January 196731 July 1967
F1 August 196731 July 1968
G1 August 196831 July 1969
H1 August 196931 July 1970
J1 August 197031 July 1971
K1 August 197131 July 1972
L1 August 197231 July 1973
M1 August 197331 July 1974
N1 August 197431 July 1975
P1 August 197531 July 1976
R1 August 197631 July 1977
S1 August 197731 July 1978
T1 August 197831 July 1979
V1 August 197931 July 1980
W1 August 198031 July 1981
X1 August 198131 July 1982
Y1 August 198231 July 1983

PREFIX LETTER NUMBER PLATES

PREFIX LETTERSTARTEND
A1 August 198331 July 1984
B1 August 198431 July 1985
C1 August 198531 July 1986
D1 August 198631 July 1987
E1 August 198731 July 1988
F1 August 198831 July 1989
G1 August 198931 July 1990
H1 August 199031 July 1991
J1 August 199131 July 1992
K1 August 199231 July 1993
L1 August 199331 July 1994
M1 August 199431 July 1995
N1 August 199531 July 1996
P1 August 199631 July 1997
R1 August 199731 July 1998
S1 August 199828 February 1999
T1 March 199931 August 1999
V1 September 199929 February 2000
W1 March 200031 August 2000
X1 September 200028 February 2001
Y1 March 200131 August 2001

CURRENT STYLE REGISTRATION NUMBER PLATES

CURRENT STYLE NUMBERSTARTEND
511 September 200128 February 2002
021 March 200231 August 2002
521 September 200228 February 2003
031 March 200331 August 2003
531 September 200329 February 2004
041 March 200431 August 2004
541 September 200428 February 2005
051 March 200531 August 2005
551 September 200528 February 2006
061 March 200631 August 2006
561 September 200628 February 2007
071 March 200731 August 2007
571 September 200729 February 2008
081 March 200831 August 2008
581 September 200828 February 2009
091 March 200931 August 2009
591 September 200928 February 2010
101 March 201031 August 2010
601 September 201028 February 2011
111 March 201131 August 2011
611 September 201129 February 2012
121 March 201231 August 2012
621 September 201228 February 2013
131 March 201331 August 2013
631 September 201328 February 2014
141 March 201431 August 2014
641 September 201428 February 2015
151 March 201531 August 2015
651 September 201528 February 2016
161 March 201631 August 2016
661 September 201629 February 2017
171 March 201731 August 2017
671 September 201728 February 2018
181 March 201831 August 2018
681 September 201828 February 2019
191 March 201931 August 2019
691 September 201928 February 2020

Obviously prior to the suffix registration numbers that came out in 1963 the number plates were dateless and therefore did not have an age identifier as such as they were not with any prefix, suffix or current style marker.

If you would like any further information you can always contact our sales staff on 0116 235 0116 who will be happy to help with any queries you may have.

If you would like to purchase a cherished number plate please browse through our huge database where we have cheap number plates, bargain number plates, DVLA number plates, personalised number plates, name number plates, football number plates, cover number plates, Irish number plates, you name it we have it.

If you cannot see anything or would like help in finding your perfect cherished number plate then please contact us on 0116 235 0116 where we will be happy to help.

Hope you find the above interesting information…..

A MUST READ – Vehicle Crime

Vehicle crime is on the increase and we are seeing various methods used by criminals in the press relating to keyless car theft. Obviously if you have a cherished number plate on your car and it is stolen you can apply to keep the personalised registration number straight away to safe guard it. You will not be able to assign it to another vehicle and no retention certificate will be issued until 6 months from the date of the theft has lapsed or the vehicle has been recovered. It is also the owner’s responsibility to contact DVLA Swansea for the certificate to be issued after this time.

How the keyless car theft works is that one criminal will hold a device close to the car that boosts the signal meant for the key, while the  other thief will stand close to the house with another device that relays that signal to the key, fooling the system.

Here is some information on how it is done and how you can prevent it from happening:

Six types of keyless car theft

Signal relaying – Keyless systems use a simple process. Fobs emit a short range”friendly” radio signal that carries only a few yards. When the associated vehicle is close by (usually within a few metres), the car  recognises the signal and unlocks its doors. The same process is used for the ignition on cars with start buttons; the fob signal usually needs to be inside the car itself. Relay thieves use wireless transmitters held up to the front door or window of a house (or the handbag/pocket of a car owner), to capture the signal from a fob and relay it to a target vehicle. An accomplice standing close to the vehicle captures the signal, fooling the car into unlocking. Once the accomplice is inside the car, the process can be repeated to start the engine.

Signal jamming – A device transmitting on the same radio frequency as remote key fobs is used to jam the signal that locks the car. The gadget might be in the pocket of a crook in a car park, or left in shrubbery near a driveway being targeted. When the owners press the lock button on their key fob, the command is prevented from reaching their vehicle and it remains unlocked. Thieves are left with an open door.

Key programming – Whether thieves break a window or use the jamming technique above, once they’re inside the car, those vehicles with a start button rather than an ignition key can be simple to steal.
Every car sold for more than a decade has been required to have a standard diagnostic port fitted. This is typically located in the front footwell. Computer hackers have developed devices that plug into the port, boot up a vehicle’s software and then program a blank key fob.
In keyless cars this can be used to start the engine as well as unlock the doors. The time needed for the programming process is as short as 14 seconds. The cost of programming gadgets on foreign websites is as low as £10.

Close range testing – Some keyless fobs may still be in range of the car when if left inside the house near enough to the vehicle. Thieves can discreetly check by trying the door handles, which may unlock the doors, but are unlikely to be able to drive off in the car if they do get inside; keyless systems require a fob to be inside the car before the engine will start.
Even if the owners do not fall victim to thieves, they may end up with a flat battery because the proximity of the key keeps electronic systems on standby.

Code grabbing – Thieves armed with advanced gadgets are thought to lie in wait for desirable cars. When the owner locks the doors, the signal is captured by the device,which then calculates the unlock code.Though there is little evidence this method is currently being used, some experts are convinced it is a looming threat. Others say it is impossible.

App hacking – This method is rarely used but could become popular as car makers attempt to connect their vehicles with owners’ smartphones. Apps that allow drivers to unlock their car let thieves do the same thing on their own phone if the can log in to the app as the vehicle’s owner. All they need is the password, which they may steal or guess.

How to avoid keyless car theft

Look for the flash – Whenever you lock your car,whether by touching the door handle or clicking the button on a remote, make sure the indicators flash and mirrors fold (if you have that functionality), and listen for the clunk of locks.

Block the signal – To prevent relay theft at home, find a safe place for your keys, out of sight and out of range of the car. You may want to store them in an aluminium tin or signal blocking box. Some believe storing the fob in a microwave oven works, but we’d be wary of that. Whatever, don’t just assume your signal blocking solution works; be sure to test its efficacy. While out and about, carry your key fob in a shielded wallet or aluminium tin. Though some people believe low-tech solutions such as wrapping the fob in tin foil can work, we’re more inclined to recommend you consider a good Faraday pouch, which blocks the signal thanks to the metal-lined material it’s made from. Be sure to protect the house, too; if thieves can’t relay a signal from your fob then they may try to gain access to your house. Make sure that’s not an easy job by ensuring doors and windows are closed and locked securely.

Fit old-fashioned locks – Buy a steering wheel lock, which makes driving away almost impossible and would significantly delay the theft of your car, meaning thieves will be deterred for fear of being caught in the act. You may also be able to fit a lock to your diagnostic port, preventing wired computer hacking.

Fit a tracker – If you have a valuable car,tracker devices are essential, we’d say. It means that unusual activity is monitored and you’re sent an an alert if it looks like the car isn’t where it should be, and cars can be followed via GPS if stolen.

Switch off at night – Some key fobs can be switched off. Find out if yours can, and do so at night.

Consider CCTV – Like trackers, CCTV cameras aren’t guaranteed to prevent your car being stolen. However, they can be a handy deterrent to put potential robbers off from stealing your car and, if they do decide to nick your set of wheels, the footage can make it easier for police to find your missing motor and the people who stole it.

Software updates – With cars becoming more and more connected, it’s more crucial than ever to keep car thieves at bay having the latest software installed on your vehicle. Some manufacturers let you download updates from their website and transfer them to your car with a USB storage device, and Tesla vehicles can be updated over-the-air when they’re connected to the internet through a WiFi router. Speak to your dealer to find out about vehicle software updates, and whether your car-maker is bringing in new keyless fobs with added security.

Neighbourhood watch – Be vigilant and report any suspicious behaviour in your neighbourhood to the police.

Out of sight, out of thieves’ minds – Keeping a car stored away from prying eyes in a locked garage is an obvious way to make sure your car isn’t spotted by opportunistic thieves prowling the local area.

We hope that this information has been of some knowledge to you.

 

MOT Exemption

The Department of Transport, Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) Swansea has announced that Classic Cars/Vehicles that are more than 40 years old will be exempt from MOT testing. As from May 20th 2018 any vehicle that is 40 years old or more will no longer need to have an MOT, however owners can volunteer for an MOT if they feel that their vehicle needs one.

Currently only vehicles from before 1960 are exempt, which represents 197,000 cars on UK roads, this new ruling will exempt a further 293,000 cars from having an MOT.

This means with no MOT, free tax and cheap Insurance if you don’t already own a classic car/vehicle then now is the time to get one. Once you have one then why not invest in a cherished or personalised number plate, a perfect accessory to your vehicle and not only are they a great investment they will also look fab on your classic vehicle.

If you would like us to assist you with any queries that you may have or would like any help in finding you a private car number plate then please contact one of our sales staff on 0116 235 0116 where they will be more than happy to help.

You can also browse through our huge database of personalised car number plates via our homepage search

If you dont want to spend a fortune but still like the idea of having your own special car number plate then we also have a varied selection of cheap and bargain car number plates that can be fully transferred to your vehicle for £116.00 all inclusive.

So what are you waiting for, happy browsing.

 

 

 

Learner Drivers will now be allowed on Motorways from 2018

From 2018 learner drivers will now be allowed to take driving lessons with an approved driving instructor in a car with dual controls.

At the moment, you can only have driving lessons on motorways after you have passed your driving test. Some newly-qualified drivers take the lessons through the voluntary Pass Plus Scheme.

Allowing learner drivers the opportunity to take lessons on the motorway from 2018 will help make sure more drivers know how to use motorways safely.

How will the change work

The change will apply to England, Scotland and Wales. Learner Drivers will need to be accompanied by an approved driving instructor and the car will need to be fitted with dual controls.

Any Motorway lessons will be voluntary. It will be up to the driving instructor to decide when the learner driver is competent enough to have a motorway lesson. Trainee driving instructors will not be allowed to take learner drivers on the motorway.

The change will only apply to learner drivers of cars, learner motorcyclists will not be allowed to have motorway lessons.

The changes are being made to allow learner drivers to get a broader driving experience before taking their driving test. To get training on how to join and leave the motorway, overtake and use the lanes correctly. To practise their driving at higher speeds and to put their theoretical knowledge into practice.

 

DVSA will not be giving driving instructors extra training on providing motorway lessons but learning materials and the car driving syllabus will be updated to incorporate motorway lessons.

DVSA will also work with driving instructor associations and Highways England to provide extra guidance and advice for driving instructors.

The exact date for this in 2018  change will be confirmed nearer the time.

The change will be well publicised so driving instructors and learner drivers are prepared for the change, and other road users know what to expect. The Highway Code rules on Motorways will also be updated.

Until the law is changed it is still ILLEGAL for learner drivers to drive on the motorway.

 

Stay safe and Happy Motoring.

Also don’t forget if you want a personalised number plate or cherished number plate please browse through our online database of millions of numbers

 

DVLA – adding missing car marques at last.

The DVLA has caved in to pressure from classic car owners and is starting to add missing car marques on to it’s online database.

If you remember we informed you of this issue back in July 2016 whereby the DVLA website was missing 43 marques on it’s online database.

Research reveals that owners and prospective buyers for previously missing marques such as Alvis, Allard, DeLorean, Crossley and Standard can now finally look up MoT history, tax and insurance data using the DVLA’s online service. And just in time too; as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is urging classic car owners to check MoT details online after admitting that the paper versions are vulnerable to forgery. Most buyers accept paper MoT’s at face value but there are cloned and clocked vehicles so now you can check online so buyers don’t have to be so trusting.

Starting from the beginning of May the online Vehicle Enquiry Service will also be updated so owners will no longer have to look up records.

The Federation of British Historic Vehicle Clubs (FBHVC), however confirmed that the changes to registering classics or making changes to the V5C online have not been made yet. Geoff Lancaster FBHVC communications director explains; What you cannot do is enter a model name which does not have a V55/5 code. If you do not include a model name in a registration form, the DVLA may pull the model and make boxes correctly shown in the paper form into the just the make field in the online database. We think we have persuaded them to stop this. The FBHVC’s recommendation to those making new applications for registrations, particularly in respect of older overseas vehicles which are not likely to have relevant codes, is to not complete the ‘model’ portion of the V55/5.

 

 

 

Number Plate News – New Vehicle Tax Rates 1st April 2017

Well there is now less than a month to go until the new system of calculating vehicle tax rates comes into force.
Although most people associate April 1st as being April Fools Day, this is the date that the DVLA introduces the new vehicle tax rates.

This change will not affect everyone as it only applies to brand new cars and some motorhomes that are registered with DVLA on or after 1st April 2017

The rates explained

Vehicle tax for the first year is based on CO2 emissions. After the first year the amount of vehicle tax that needs to be paid depends on the type of vehicle.

£140 a year for petrol or diesel vehicles

£130 a year for alternative fuel vehicles (hybrids, LPG and bioethanol)

£0 a year for vehicles with Zero CO2 emissions

If a vehicle has a list price of more than £40,000 the rate of vehicle tax is based on the CO2’s for the first year.

After the first year the rate depends on the type of vehicle (petrol, diesel, alternative fuel or zero emissions) and an additional rate of £310 a year for the next 5 years.

After those 5 years the vehicle will then be taxed at one of the standard rates of £140, £130, or £0 depending on the vehicle type.

 

Number Plate News – Using your phone whilst Driving – New Law from 1/3/2017

Today marks the first day of March and it also brings in a new law regarding using your mobile phone.
As from today if you are caught using it whilst behind the wheel you will be fined £200 and given 6 penalty points.
If you are a new driver and have had your licence less than 2 years you could also face an immediate ban.

Previously the fixed penalty fine was £30 but in 2007 the fine was raised to £60. It was raised again to £100 in 2013 and this new legislation see’s the fine increased to £200.

The number of penalty points that you received used to be 3 but this new government legislation has increased it to 6 and as new drivers are only given 6 points for the first 2 years, if they are caught using their mobile phones now behind the wheel they will lose their licence as it will be an instant ban.
Previously in some police force areas, motorists could avoid the points by taking a remedial driving course.

The reason behind this new law is because of the numerous fatalities and incidents caused whilst drivers are distracted while using their mobile phones/devices.

The Department of Transport figures show that there were 492 accidents in Britain in 2014 where a driver was distracted or impaired whilst using their mobile phones. In the past 10 years more than 200 people have been killed by drivers distracted by their phones/devices and the mobile phone was a contributory factor in 43 fatal accidents in 2014 alone.

So when you get in your car, as from today programme the Sat Nav put the phone away, remember the call or text can wait and be done when you have stopped driving and have parked up safely.

Stay safe and keep others safe when you are on the road. Is that call or text really worth it?

DON’T DO IT!

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