Motor Cars

Doing these whilst driving could result in a Fine

When it comes to the law and driving most of us think we know the do’s and dont’s of what you can do whilst driving, however there are some things that not all of us know and these can be illegal when driving, so here is a list of things you might not know are illegal when driving..

Using your mobile phone as a sat nav in an unfixed position. Whilst we all know that it is an offence to use your phone (calling/texting) whilst driving, some use it as a sat nav, but it is illegal if it is not fixed on your windscreen or dashboard, the phone needs to be in clear sight and not with you holding it. Due to a recent law change if you are caught breaching this you will receive six points on your licence and a £200 fine, you could also face a driving ban if you have had your license for less than 2 years.

Lots of us motorists will flash other motorists to let them know of speed cameras however you could face a minimum of a £30 fine, you are only supposed to flash your lights at other motorists to warn them of your presence.

Eating or drinking, applying makeup, changing a CD in your car could land you a fine of £100 and up to three to nine penalty points, this is because the police can prosecute you as you may not be in complete control of your vehicle.

Splashing a pedestrian with water could land you with a fine of anything from £100 – £5000 this is because it is classed as an offence to drive “without reasonable consideration for other persons”

Hogging the middle lane of the motorway could land you with a fine as this falls into the catergory of careless driving and you could end up with three penalty points and a £100 fine.

Having a dirty number plate could land you with a £1000 fine as it can make them unreadable so you need to make sure they can seen and not filthy.

Beeping your horn could land you with a £30 fine, you are not supposed to beep your horn for any other reason than alerting someone of your presence, not out of frustration or a little road rage!

Undertaking is a criminal offence and however tempting this is especially on the motorway when someone is hogging the middle lane is not only dangerous you could find yourself in court.

Smoking in your car is illegal and taking a prescription drug before driving could see you banned.

When parking a at night drivers must not park on a road facing against the flow of trafic unless in a dedicated space.

You must never place a rear facing baby seat in a seat with an activated front airbag.

When towing a trailer or a caravan on a motorway you must not exceed 60mph.

Having a child in your vehicle without the appropriate car seat. You must have a child car seat for any child up to the age of 12 or until they reach 135cm in height and the seat needs to be suitable for their weight.

You must not drive on a pavement, footpath or bridleway unless gaining access to a property or in an emergency.

Not informing DVLA Swansea of any changes to your details ie your name and address and also regarding medical conditions such as epilepsy, strokes, neurological and mental health conditions physical disabilities and visual impairments.

Cherished Number Plates

Cherished Number Plates – What are they?

Typically cherished number plates are usually dateless registration numbers that are dated pre 1963 and were usually found on vintage and classic vehicles. Nowadays a cherished number plate can be anything! You have the names, the dateless, the prefix and suffix registration numbers and now the newstyle number plates, not forgetting the Northern Ireland registration numbers it can mean absolutely nothing to you but to someone else everything. You can even get your full name.. example NGO 1D if you are called Nigel Gold. Cherished Number Plates are an investment!!

Years ago Cherished Number Plates as they were coined could cost tens of thousands of pounds and many still do just take a look at some of the recent sales in the auctions some numbers fetching over half a million pounds…. but you can get a Cherished Number Plate for you for as little as £116 all in see our cheap page

The ‘Term’ Cherished /Personalised number plate was coined because for these registration numbers to remain in circulation for such a long time ie their ownership had to be passed along, sometimes the registration number remaining in a particular family for generations.

The best example of one such Cherished Number Plate was the renowned A 1 number plate which was one of the first registration numbers given out by London County Council. The number plate was secured by Earl Russell who queued outside their offices in 1903 to acquire the registration number for his Napier and he had it until 1907 when he sold his Napier car with the A 1 number plate on to a gentleman called George Pettyt who was the chairman of the London County Council. He kept the number is his possession and had it transferred onto various vehicles. When Mr Pettyt died in 1950 the number plate was on a Sunbeam Talbot and was left in his will to a Mr Laker who in turn kept the registration number (this was stipulated in the will of Mr Pettyt that he had to retain the number plate until his death) until his death in 1970 .

After Mr Lakers death, Dunlop purchased the number plate for a staggering £2500 which on today’s market would probably be a million pounds plus’ and the money was donated to the Guide Dogs for the Blind as Mr Laker had stated it was his wish for a dogs charity to receive the money from the sale of the registration number A 1.

In the early 2000’s the registration A 1 was sold again and Prince Bolkiah a member of the Brunei Royal Family became the new owner and it was paired with 1 A to be displayed on matching white Bentley Azures. Quite a history !!!

How do I assign a Cherished Number Plate ?

If buying from a number plate dealer, this is usually done for you by them. If the number you are buying is on a retention certificate then the documents required are the current V5C for the receiving vehicle which has to be currently taxed and MOT’d. Most of these transfers can now be done instantly using the online facility via the DVLA website upon cleared funds, however if the application cannot be processed online then it will have to be posted to DVLA Swansea cherished number plate section and the transfer can take up to 10 days.

If the number you are buying is already on a vehicle then this will have to be posted and on most occasions is all processed within 14 days, however this can take longer if the donor vehicle needs to have a DVLA inspection (most pre-1963 vehicles need to be inspected by DVLA and the odd newer vehicle, however we cannot determine which ones).
The DVLA usually send an appointed inspector to come and check the vehicle and its identity. The cost incurred in transferring a cherished number plate is £80.00 which is made payable to DVLA Swansea.

How do I retain a Cherished Number Plate ?

The cost to Retain a cherished number plate is £80.00 which is made payable to DVLA Swansea. When you retain a number plate the certificate will show that the assignment fee has already been paid so you would not pay any further fees when you come to transfer the cherished number plate off the retention certificate at a later date.
A retention certificate is also now valid for 10 years from the date that the number plate is retained by DVLA Swansea.

How do I sell my number plate ?

If you have a cherished number plate that you want to sell, if this is on a retention certificate then all we require is the valid V750 or V778 document which can usually be transferred online using the DVLA website facility. If the number is on an existing vehicle then the rules require that the donor vehicle must have been taxed by yourselves when it had a current MOT and then you have 5 years to sell the number. If it goes over the 5 years then in order to sell the number plate you would have to get the vehicle re-taxed and MOT’d. All MOT’d exempt vehicles however do require a voluntary MOT to take part in the cherished number plate’s transfer rules set out by DVLA.

So a little bit of history for you and some common questions answered.

If you would like any information on a number plate you wish to sell or would like us to find a number plate to suit you then give our Sales Team a call we are always happy to help 0116 235 0116

Alternatively why not browse our huge database of cherished number plates.

A MUST READ – Vehicle Crime

Vehicle crime is on the increase and we are seeing various methods used by criminals in the press relating to keyless car theft. Obviously if you have a cherished number plate on your car and it is stolen you can apply to keep the personalised registration number straight away to safe guard it. You will not be able to assign it to another vehicle and no retention certificate will be issued until 6 months from the date of the theft has lapsed or the vehicle has been recovered. It is also the owner’s responsibility to contact DVLA Swansea for the certificate to be issued after this time.

How the keyless car theft works is that one criminal will hold a device close to the car that boosts the signal meant for the key, while the  other thief will stand close to the house with another device that relays that signal to the key, fooling the system.

Here is some information on how it is done and how you can prevent it from happening:

Six types of keyless car theft

Signal relaying – Keyless systems use a simple process. Fobs emit a short range”friendly” radio signal that carries only a few yards. When the associated vehicle is close by (usually within a few metres), the car  recognises the signal and unlocks its doors. The same process is used for the ignition on cars with start buttons; the fob signal usually needs to be inside the car itself. Relay thieves use wireless transmitters held up to the front door or window of a house (or the handbag/pocket of a car owner), to capture the signal from a fob and relay it to a target vehicle. An accomplice standing close to the vehicle captures the signal, fooling the car into unlocking. Once the accomplice is inside the car, the process can be repeated to start the engine.

Signal jamming – A device transmitting on the same radio frequency as remote key fobs is used to jam the signal that locks the car. The gadget might be in the pocket of a crook in a car park, or left in shrubbery near a driveway being targeted. When the owners press the lock button on their key fob, the command is prevented from reaching their vehicle and it remains unlocked. Thieves are left with an open door.

Key programming – Whether thieves break a window or use the jamming technique above, once they’re inside the car, those vehicles with a start button rather than an ignition key can be simple to steal.
Every car sold for more than a decade has been required to have a standard diagnostic port fitted. This is typically located in the front footwell. Computer hackers have developed devices that plug into the port, boot up a vehicle’s software and then program a blank key fob.
In keyless cars this can be used to start the engine as well as unlock the doors. The time needed for the programming process is as short as 14 seconds. The cost of programming gadgets on foreign websites is as low as £10.

Close range testing – Some keyless fobs may still be in range of the car when if left inside the house near enough to the vehicle. Thieves can discreetly check by trying the door handles, which may unlock the doors, but are unlikely to be able to drive off in the car if they do get inside; keyless systems require a fob to be inside the car before the engine will start.
Even if the owners do not fall victim to thieves, they may end up with a flat battery because the proximity of the key keeps electronic systems on standby.

Code grabbing – Thieves armed with advanced gadgets are thought to lie in wait for desirable cars. When the owner locks the doors, the signal is captured by the device,which then calculates the unlock code.Though there is little evidence this method is currently being used, some experts are convinced it is a looming threat. Others say it is impossible.

App hacking – This method is rarely used but could become popular as car makers attempt to connect their vehicles with owners’ smartphones. Apps that allow drivers to unlock their car let thieves do the same thing on their own phone if the can log in to the app as the vehicle’s owner. All they need is the password, which they may steal or guess.

How to avoid keyless car theft

Look for the flash – Whenever you lock your car,whether by touching the door handle or clicking the button on a remote, make sure the indicators flash and mirrors fold (if you have that functionality), and listen for the clunk of locks.

Block the signal – To prevent relay theft at home, find a safe place for your keys, out of sight and out of range of the car. You may want to store them in an aluminium tin or signal blocking box. Some believe storing the fob in a microwave oven works, but we’d be wary of that. Whatever, don’t just assume your signal blocking solution works; be sure to test its efficacy. While out and about, carry your key fob in a shielded wallet or aluminium tin. Though some people believe low-tech solutions such as wrapping the fob in tin foil can work, we’re more inclined to recommend you consider a good Faraday pouch, which blocks the signal thanks to the metal-lined material it’s made from. Be sure to protect the house, too; if thieves can’t relay a signal from your fob then they may try to gain access to your house. Make sure that’s not an easy job by ensuring doors and windows are closed and locked securely.

Fit old-fashioned locks – Buy a steering wheel lock, which makes driving away almost impossible and would significantly delay the theft of your car, meaning thieves will be deterred for fear of being caught in the act. You may also be able to fit a lock to your diagnostic port, preventing wired computer hacking.

Fit a tracker – If you have a valuable car,tracker devices are essential, we’d say. It means that unusual activity is monitored and you’re sent an an alert if it looks like the car isn’t where it should be, and cars can be followed via GPS if stolen.

Switch off at night – Some key fobs can be switched off. Find out if yours can, and do so at night.

Consider CCTV – Like trackers, CCTV cameras aren’t guaranteed to prevent your car being stolen. However, they can be a handy deterrent to put potential robbers off from stealing your car and, if they do decide to nick your set of wheels, the footage can make it easier for police to find your missing motor and the people who stole it.

Software updates – With cars becoming more and more connected, it’s more crucial than ever to keep car thieves at bay having the latest software installed on your vehicle. Some manufacturers let you download updates from their website and transfer them to your car with a USB storage device, and Tesla vehicles can be updated over-the-air when they’re connected to the internet through a WiFi router. Speak to your dealer to find out about vehicle software updates, and whether your car-maker is bringing in new keyless fobs with added security.

Neighbourhood watch – Be vigilant and report any suspicious behaviour in your neighbourhood to the police.

Out of sight, out of thieves’ minds – Keeping a car stored away from prying eyes in a locked garage is an obvious way to make sure your car isn’t spotted by opportunistic thieves prowling the local area.

We hope that this information has been of some knowledge to you.

 

Number Plates – Auction

Next month sees another auction of Personalised and Cherished DVLA number plates. There are 1250 new previously unissued number plates up for sale. If you would like to register your interest or would like us at Motor Marks to bid for a particular registration number for you please contact one of our sales staff on 0116 235 0116 or contact us via the website using the online contact form or email us at admin@motormarks.co.uk
There are some really nice personalised number plates coming up for sale and we have picked out a few for you below.
If you would like to see the whole list of number plates being offered for sale then please visit the Auction page

BET 805S

THE 911C

OW10 ZAT

HER 811E

D111 PSY

DR18 BLE

K117 TTY

POS 71T

Don’t forget the above are just a few of the numbers being offered for sale. If you only want a cheap or bargain number plate then why not take a look at out cheap page where you can purchase a cherished car number plate for as little as £116.00 ( £30.00 plus vat and £80 transfer fee).

MoT’s and Classic Cars

Classic Cars built between 1st January 1960 and 31st December 1977 become MoT exempt from this Sunday 20th May 2018 making the complete responsibility of their roadworthiness placed in the hands of their owners. This may seem a massive change but in fact the situation is business as usual, as keepers of these such vehicles and indeed all other vehicles – have always been responsible for the roadworthiness of their vehicles, the difference is that now such keepers will be persuaded to undertake their own regular vehicle roadworthiness inspections. Pre 1978 cars classed as historic may still be presented for MoT’s but likely that inspectors overtime become fewer and farther between and may lead to failure notices where none should have been issued with resultant difficulties in achieving a pass at the same place or understanding the status of the vehicle. Worse still vehicles could be issued a pass certificate when the car is in fact unsafe.

Large goods vehicles (ie goods vehicles with a maximum laden weight of more than 3.5 tonnes) and buses (ie vehicles with 8 or more seats) that are used commercially will not be exempted from periodic testing when they reach 40 years old. In addition a vehicle that has been substantially changed within the previous 30 years will have to be submitted for annual MoT testing.

How to declare a vehicle for the 40 year MoT exemption.
Vehicle keepers are required to ensure their vehicles are taxed when used on a public road. From May 20th 2018 the keeper of the vehicle can declare their vehicle exempt from the MoT at the point of taxing it if it was constructed more than 40 years ago. You will be asked when declaring the MoT exemption that there has been no substantial changes to the vehicle (a vehicle will be considered substantially changed if the technical characteristics of the main components have changed in the previous 30 years unless the changes fall into specific categories)

Chassis: Replacements of the same pattern as the original, monocoque bodyshells including any sub frames (replacements of the same pattern as the original) are not considered a substantial change.

Axles/Running Gear: Alteration of and/or method of suspension or steering does constitute a substantial change

Engine: Alternative cubic capacities of the same basic engine and alternative original equipment engines are not considered a substantial change. If the number of cylinders in an engine is different from the original it is likely to be but not necessarily the case that the current engine is not alternative original equipment.

The following are considered acceptable NOT substantial changes if they fall into these specific categories:
Changes that are made to preserve a vehicle, which in all cases must be when original-type parts are no longer reasonably available.
Changes of a type that can be demonstrated to have been made when vehicles of the type were in production or in general use (within 10 years of the end of production).
In respect to axles and running gear changes made to improve efficiency,safety or environmental performance.
In respect of vehicles that have been commercial vehicles, changes which can be demonstrated were being made when these vehicles were being used commercially.

In addition if a vehicle (including a motorcyle):
Has been issued with a registration number with a Q prefix, or
Is a kit car assembled from components from various makes and models of vehicle, or
Is a reconstructed classic vehicle as defined by DVLA guidance, or
Is a kit conversion, where a kit of new parts is added to an existing vehicle, or old parts are added to a kit of a manufactured body, chassis or monocoque bodyshell changing the general appearance of the vehicle; It will be considered to have been substantially changed and will not be exempt from MoT testing.

However if any of the above types of vehicle is taxed as a ‘historic vehicle’ and has not been modified during the previous 30 years, it can be considered as Vehicles of Historic Interest (VHI). (Keepers of VHIs exempt from periodic testing continue to be responsible for their vehicles roadworthiness). The guidance is only intended to determine the testing position of a substantially changed vehicle.

How to register your vehicle from MoT Exemption
Where vehicle keepers first apply for the historic vehicle tax class, it must be done at a post office. If you are declaring that your vehicle is exempt from MoT you will need to complete a V112 declaration form, taking into consideration the substantially changed guidelines (as defined above). Further re-licensing applications, including making subsequent declarations that the vehicle does not require an MoT, can be completed online. gov.uk/historic-vehicles

 

Also what better accessory for your classic or historic vehicle, a personalised or cherished number plate. Cheap, Bargain or expensive number plates we have millions to choose from, browse through our database or alternatively give one of our experienced sales staff a call on 0116 235 0116.

MOT Exemption

The Department of Transport, Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) Swansea has announced that Classic Cars/Vehicles that are more than 40 years old will be exempt from MOT testing. As from May 20th 2018 any vehicle that is 40 years old or more will no longer need to have an MOT, however owners can volunteer for an MOT if they feel that their vehicle needs one.

Currently only vehicles from before 1960 are exempt, which represents 197,000 cars on UK roads, this new ruling will exempt a further 293,000 cars from having an MOT.

This means with no MOT, free tax and cheap Insurance if you don’t already own a classic car/vehicle then now is the time to get one. Once you have one then why not invest in a cherished or personalised number plate, a perfect accessory to your vehicle and not only are they a great investment they will also look fab on your classic vehicle.

If you would like us to assist you with any queries that you may have or would like any help in finding you a private car number plate then please contact one of our sales staff on 0116 235 0116 where they will be more than happy to help.

You can also browse through our huge database of personalised car number plates via our homepage search

If you dont want to spend a fortune but still like the idea of having your own special car number plate then we also have a varied selection of cheap and bargain car number plates that can be fully transferred to your vehicle for £116.00 all inclusive.

So what are you waiting for, happy browsing.

 

 

 

Number Plates – Perfect Present

Well Christmas day  is once again nearly upon us. Can’t decide whether to stay with the old faithful and safe christmas presents this year such as jewellery, chocolates, socks, perfume etc then why not get that special someone something different and unique this year. Why not get them their own private cherished number plate. This gift is not only be personal to them but will also be an investment for years to come.

We at Motor Marks have an extensive database of personalised car number plates and with new additions being added daily we are sure that we will have something suitable for you.

Need a bit of help? then why not give our sales staff a call on 0116 235 0116 where they can help you in choosing that perfect number plate for that special someone in your life or for a family member.

Prices for our cherished number plates are as little as £30 plus vat and the £80 ct fee. If you don’t want to put the number on a vehicle straightaway you can have the number plate supplied to you on a 10 year retention certificate and we can sort out the transfer for you at no extra cost when you are ready.

Give that someone special a gift as special as they are.

Wishing all our customers a very Happy Christmas from all of us at Motor Marks

 

Your Eyesight and Driving

We all know the saying ‘keep your eyes on the road’ but how often do you get your eyes checked ? In the UK once you have passed your Driving Test you don’t have to have any further visual checks. On your driving test you must demonstrate that your eyesight is good enough to be able to drive safely. You do this by reading a clean car number plate of the old style from a minimum distance of 20.5 metres ( approx 67 feet or 5 car lengths).

In some European countries however you are required to have a visual test every 10 years. Do you think this should be the case in the UK?

 

Think your eyesight may be getting worse? Don’t delay act now.

 

We all lead busy hectic lives and might overlook the signs that our eyes are not as good as they once were. You might find road signs harder to read or judging distances may be harder or you may find it more difficult when you drive at night. These could be signs that your eyesight may be deteriorating.

So make sure you stay alert and get your eyesight checked every 2 years. Stay safe when driving.

 

 

Number Plates Auction

There will be the chance to grab yourself a Cherished, Personalised or DVLA number plate in November as there will be another Auction with 1250 number plates up for sale.

Below we have compiled a list of the cherished number plates that are up for sale over the course of the 3 day Auction.

Will you be bidding?

If you would like MOTOR MARKS  to bid on your behalf or would like to ask a question or get some advice please call us and speak to one of our sales staff on 0116 235 0116.

Alternatively you can view the whole list of numbers being offered for sale on our Auction page

 

Alternatively if none of the number plates in the auction are for you don’t forget we have millions of car number plates to choose from so why not browse our database.

Road Safety Advice

Here at Motor Marks although we deal in the sale and purchase of cherished, personalised and DVLA car registration numbers browse our database we also like to inform our potential customers and road users of the need to be aware of the potential dangers that you can encounter on the roads.

We have therefore compiled a Road Safety Advice for you to familiarise with, even if you already know, it doesn’t help to read up on it again.

Driving Too Close – The 2 second rule.

You should always drive with at least a 2 second time gap between you and the vehicle in front; for example:

On a dry road, choose a point like a lamp post or road sign
When the vehicle in front passes that point, say out loud “Only a fool breaks the 2 second rule”
Check your position in relation to your chosen point as you finish saying this. If you have already passed the point, you are driving too close to the vehicle in front and need to drop back.
In wet weather, double the distance between your vehicle and the one in front by saying “Only a fool breaks the 2 second rule ” twice.

One of the key reasons that drivers lose concentration or become stressed when driving is because they are in a hurry.

Remember COAST 

Concentrate on your driving at all times

Observe all around yyou

Anticipate what might happen next

Space give space at all times, it gives you

Time to plan your driving

Tiredness and Fatigue

It is estimated that drivers who fall asleep at the wheel account for around one fifth of incidents on major roads, to avoid this:

Plan your journey to include a 15 minute break every 2 hours
Don’t start a long trip if you are already tired
Remember the risks if you have to get up unusually early to start a long drive
Try to avoid long trips between midnight and 6am when you are likely to feel sleepy anyway
If you start to feel sleepy, find a safe place to stop
The only real cure for tiredness is proper sleep. A caffeine drink and a 20 minute nap are a short-term solution

Mental and physical fatigue through working long hours, lack of rest and/or not eating properly or getting de-hydrated could lead to a lapse in concentration, reduced reaction time and poor decision making over safety critical issues.

Research shows that almost 20% of collisions on major roads are sleep-related
Peak times for collisions are in the early hours and after lunch
About 40% of sleep-related incidents involve commercial vehicles
Men under 30 have the highest risk of falling asleep at the wheel

 

Emergency Vehicles

By following a few simple steps, you can help the emergency services get to the scene faster and safer:

When you hear sirens, don’t panic and stay alert
When you see blue flashing lights scan the road looking for a place that will allow the emergency vehicle safe passage. You should use your indicators or hand signals to let other drivers and the emergency vehicle driver know your intent to pull over
Don’t slam on your brakes or stop abruptly blocking the road or a junction
Do not mount the pavement causing a danger to other road users
Wait for the emergency vehicle to pass and watch for more than one. Check to make sure the way is clear and signal before moving back into traffic
Never follow or try to outrun the emergency vehicle. If you do, you will most likely be breaking the speed limit and could also face charges of careless or dangerous driving
Never try to overtake a moving emergency vehicle displaying the flashing lights unless directed to do so by a police officer or emergency personnel

 

When will I be safe to drive?

Do you know what the actual limits are when it comes to having a drink and then driving?

Bottled Lager. Drink five bottles and you should not frive for at least 11 hours. That’s 11am the morning after if you finish drinking at midnight.
Wine. If you drink a bottle of 15% wine (just three 250ml glasses) – you should not drive for 13 hours – that’s 1pm the next day if you finish drinking at midnight
Pints. Drink four pints of lager and you should not drive for at least 13 hours. That’s 1pm the next day if you finish drinking at midnight.
Spirits. Drink four 70ml doubles and you should not drive for 13 hours. Thats 1pm the next day iof you finish drinking at midnight.
Cans. Drink five super-strength cans and you should not drive for about 21 hours – almost a full day later.

 

Know your speed limits

Check your speedometer regularly
Know the limits – look for signs, especially at junctions
Street lighting means 30mph, until signs say otherwise
Remember, speed limits are a maximum not a target, try using 3rd gear in a 30mph limit to help you stay in the limit
Recognise what makes you speed – keeping up with traffic, overtaking or being tailgated
Concentrate – distracted drivers speed
The minimum penalty for speeding is £100 fine an 3 penalty points added on your licence.

Be aware and stay safe.

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